ASPCA Assists Local Agencies in Removing Nearly 30 Dogs from

Marion County Property

Earlier this year, upon the request of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Have A Heart Pet Shelter, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) assisted with the removal of nearly 30 dogs from a property in Marion County, Arkansas.

The animals were removed from the property after Have A Heart Pet Shelter was made aware of a situation in which an overwhelmed pet owner had more than two dozen dogs living in a small building without access to adequate shelter, medical care, or running water. The pet owner realized she could not provide adequate care for the animals and agreed to voluntarily surrender all of them.  After collaborating with the Sheriff’s Office, Have A Heart Pet Shelter reached out to the ASPCA for assistance.

“While Have A Heart Pet Shelter provided assistance for the pet owner when we were first made aware of the situation, including providing food, spay/neuter services, and relocating puppies living on the property, it became clear that this was beyond the scope of services we could provide due to limited resources,” said Linda Vincent, President of Have A Heart Pet Shelter. “Have A Heart Pet Shelter cannot thank the Marion County Sheriff’s Office or the ASPCA enough for their role in helping us save the lives of these dogs.”  

All the animals were relocated to an emergency shelter operated by the ASPCA, except for one female dog who was in the midst of delivering puppies at the time of the rescue. She is currently quarantined at Have A Heart Pet Shelter with her puppies, all of whom are under careful observation and will hopefully be made available for adoption in the coming weeks.

“ASPCA is pleased to be in a position where we have the expertise and resources to support local agencies in need and improve the lives of animals in communities across the country,” said Jessica Rushin, senior director of ASPCA National Field Response. “While some of these animals will require intensive behavioral rehabilitation and have a long road ahead, we’re thrilled to see many of them thriving as we prepare them for the next chapter in their lives.”

Vincent said she hopes this case will help raise awareness about the services Have A Heart Pet Shelter provides in the community and will encourage residents to report any suspected animal welfare concerns in Marion County.

“Our number one goal is to bring comfort and care to animals in need and to help find them homes where they can live out their lives as family members,” said Vincent. “While animals from this case are not yet available for adoption, we hope this will inspire people to open their hearts and homes to some of the other amazing animals currently available for adoption at our shelter.”

To learn more about how you can adopt from Have A Heart Animal Shelter, visit haveaheartpetshelter.org. To report suspected animal cruelty or neglect contact your local law enforcement authorities.